September-October 2019

From this Issue...

The crucial role of power supply and data transmission in autonomous driving

Autonomous vehicles are information-rich and increasingly defined by software that generates enormous amounts of data to train artificially intelligent (AI) algorithms

Lattice CrossLinkPlus FPGAs accelerate and enhance video bridging in MIPI-based systems

Lattice Semiconductor introduced its CrossLinkPlus FPGA family for MIPI D-PHY based embedded vision systems.

Welding and bonding technologies for medical devices

A growing trend in preventative health is wearable technology, like smart watches and monitors that are placed on the skin.

Analogue output modules for a 0-5V to -10V – +10V signal converter

This series of columns is dedicated to a project involving thirteen analogue input modules and seven analogue output modules for a 5V microcontroller, connecting them to its ADC and DAC channels.

Integrated passive components simplify signal conditioning in smaller packages

Integrated passive components (IPCs) are attracting increasing interest due to the miniaturisation of wireless devices.

A simple circuit that measures relative intensity of two light sources

Can I measure the difference between two light sources with an instrumentation amplifier?

Specialised power for everyday technology

Convenience and insight continue to shape the development of health technology, with wearable electronics still proving a mainstay – and at the heart of it all are batteries.

Convolutional neural networks in image classification

Before any convolutional neural network is properly functional, it must be trained, i.e. it must learn the items it needs to detect and classify.

CEA-Leti creates alternative AR technology by combining integrated optics and holography

CEA-Leti has developed a novel retinal-projection system for augmented reality (AR) applications, based on integrated optics and holography, thus overcoming the limitations of existing AR glasses that suffer from limited field-of-view and bulky optical systems.

Electronic chip acts like the brain to make memories

Engineers have mimicked the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories.

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