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High-sensitivity current probes for Yokogawa oscilloscopes

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Two new high-sensitivity current probes are now available for Yokogawa’s families of mixed-signal oscilloscopes and ScopeCorders.

The 701917, covering a frequency range from DC to 50 MHz, and the 701918, covering DC to 120 MHz, offer sensitivities ten times higher than previous models (typically 1 V/A) along with low noise levels of typically 60 µA RMS. They are ideally suited to the measurement of low-level currents from about 1 mA to 5 A.

The probes feature a slim, lightweight sensor head which is easy to use in confined spaces. Automatic zero adjustment and demagnetisation are accessed via a button on the termination box, making setup quick and easy. An overload/jaw-unlocked warning is included for added safety.

Connection to the instrument is via the front-panel BNC connector. The power can be provided from the oscilloscope’s probe power option or from a separate probe power supply.
Applications include tests on LED drivers, controllers and power supplies, evaluation of embedded power supplies, measurements of the power consumption of low-voltage devices such as FPGAs, and tests on embedded components in domestic appliances.

The 701917 and 701918 probes are designed for use with Yokogawa’s DLM2000 and DLM4000 Series of mixed-signal oscilloscopes and the DL850E and DL850EV Series of ScopeCorders.

For further information about the high-sensitivity current probes visit tmi.yokogawa.com

About Yokogawa Test & Measurement

Yokogawa has been developing measurement solutions for 100 years, consistently finding new ways to give R&D teams the tools they need to gain the best insights from their measurement strategies. The company has pioneered accurate power measurement throughout its history, and is the market leader in digital power analysers.

Yokogawa instruments are renowned for maintaining high levels of precision and for continuing to deliver value for far longer than the typical shelf-life of such equipment. Yokogawa believes that precise and effective measurement lies at the heart of successful innovation – and has focused its own R&D on providing the tools that researchers and engineers need to address challenges great and small.

Yokogawa takes pride in its reputation for quality, both in the products it delivers – often adding new features in response to specific client requests – and the level of service and advice provided to clients, helping to devise measurement strategies for even the most challenging environments.

The guaranteed accuracy and precision of Yokogawa’s instruments results from the fact that Yokogawa has its own European standards laboratory at its European headquarters in The Netherlands. This facility is the only industrial (i.e. non-government or national) organisation in the world to offer accredited power calibration, at frequencies up to 100 kHz. ISO 17025 accreditation demonstrates the international competence of the laboratory.

About Yokogawa

Yokogawa’s global network of 88 companies spans 56 countries. Founded in 1915, the US$3.5 billion company engages in cutting-edge research and innovation. Yokogawa is active in the industrial automation and control (IA), test and measurement, and aviation and other business segments. For more information about Yokogawa, please visit the company’s website www.yokogawa.com.

For further information please contact:

Terry Marrinan
European Test & Measurement Centre
Yokogawa Europe BV
Euroweg 2
3825 HD Amersfoort
The Netherlands

Tel: +31 (0) 88 464 1811
Fax: +31 (0) 88 464 1111
Email: terry.marrinan@nl.yokogawa.com
www.tmi.yokogawa.com

Jean Wilson
Peter Bush Communications
The Old Forge
Audley End Business Centre
London Road
Wendens Ambo
Saffron Walden
Essex
CB11 4JL

Tel : +44 (0) 1799 542858
Email : jean@peterbush.co.uk

Part of the Napier Group www.napier.co.uk

 

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